How many eggs should my baby eat per week?

How many eggs per week should I give to my baby?

Is there a maximum number of eggs my baby can eat per week? No. However, there is a minimum number of times per week and the reason has to do with allergy prevention.

 

egg, allergy, egg allergy, solids

 

Of course, it’s best to vary the foods you offer to your baby and too much of any food isn’t ideal.  Surprisingly, the cholesterol in food has little impact on blood cholesterol and eggs are healthy for your baby to eat regularly. So go for it! Eggs are super nutritious for both you and your baby.

 

Why did I choose egg as a first food?

 

  • Eggs have a soft texture that’s perfect for beginner babies
  • Eggs naturally contains vitamin D (good for immune function and bone health)
  • Eggs are packed with high quality protein for healthy bones & muscles
  • Eggs contain lutein & choline, nutrients that are essential for brain & eye development

Eggs are an all-around easy first food.

 

When should eggs be introduced? Isn’t my baby going to be allergic?

 

According to the Joint Statement by Health Canada, the Canadian Paediatric Society’s Nutrition and Gastroenterology Committee (CPS), Dietitians of Canada (DC), the Breastfeeding Committee for Canada (BCC) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), “common food allergens such as peanut, fish, wheat, milk products, soy and whole eggs, can be introduced from about six months of age. Several of these foods, such as iron-fortified infant cereals with wheat, fish and whole eggs, should be among the first solid foods offered because they are also a source of iron”.

 

We all know that eggs are a part of the top food allergens so you may be wondering if eggs are safe for a 6 month old. In fact, there is some evidence that is now showing that early introduction (around 6 months of age) may be beneficial. According to a the revised American Academy of Pediatrics policy published in March 2019, there is no evidence that delaying the introduction of allergenic foods, including peanuts, eggs, and fish, beyond 4 to 6 months prevents allergies. There actually may be benefits of introducing allergenic foods in the first year of life to infants when a while is developmentally ready: around 6 months of age (see report here).

 

How many eggs per week should my baby eat? Is there a maximum?

 

Actually, there is no maximum number of eggs per week that your baby can eat. But there may be a minimum! Here is the reason there is a minimum number of times per week you want to offer eggs to your baby, and it has to do with allergies. According to the Canadian Pediatric Society’s Position Paper published in January 2019, once an allergenic food (like an egg) has been introduced successfully and your baby has shown no symptoms of an allergy, it’s important to continue to offer it regularly. Eating a small amount of egg a few times a week can help maintain your baby’s tolerance to eggs and actually help prevent allergy.

Here is my baby’s first time eating egg at 6 months of age:

 

 

You can see him exploring, squishing, touching and eating a tiny bit. That’s okay and totally part of the learning process. I offered it again a second time, 2 days later. The science isn’t clear about how many days to wait in between each food to watch for signs of an allergy. I decided to wait 2 days before offering it to him again. Watch me offer a strip of an egg omelette to my 6 month old for a second time:

 

 

Watch another video of a 6 month old baby (my oldest) eating a whole hard boiled egg for the first time:

 

 

How can I cook an egg so it’s safe for my baby?

Here is the recipe I followed to cook the egg offered in the first 2 videos about when my baby was 6 months old: 1 egg mixed with 1 tsp olive oil. Pan fry on medium-low heat until cooked through. Let cool and offer to your baby starting at 6 months old in strips. I actually cooked one egg on the first day, offered him half and kept the second half for his second time. Easy. You can also offer scrambled eggs, a hard boiled egg, a microwaved egg or an egg omelette to your baby.

 

Can you provide me with recipes containing eggs that are safe for my 6-month old who is developmentally ready to eat solids?

Here are some of my favourite recipes that contain eggs that are safe for beginner babies:

 

Can you provide me with a list of egg-free recipes?

 

How can I replace an egg in a recipe if my baby is allergic to eggs?

In most recipes, you can replace each egg by 1 tbsp (15 ml) of ground chia seeds soaked in 3 tbsp (15 ml) of warm water. Substitution. Contact me if you have a question about a specific recipe of mine.

 

My Starting Solids Online Course

If you are a caregiver who is starting solids with your baby, it’s important to be informed about how to proceed safely. In my Starting Solids online course, I walk you through the process of safely introducing foods, whether you have already started offering mashed foods or not. You learn by watching 2-5 minute informational videos. You can ask me an unlimited number of questions in the course and I personally answer them very quickly. SIGN UP TO MY STARTING SOLIDS ONLINE COURSE HERE.

 

If you are a registered dietitian (RD)

This is important information we all need to be familiar with. In fact, I’m preparing an exclusive training for members of my International Infant Nutrition Network of Registered Dietitians (RDs) about the most recent evidence-based information about the introduction of allergens coming soon. When you join my Network, you get access to 9 additional CEUs exclusive to members of the network along with my support, a license to use all my material to teach workshops in your own city and much more. Learn more about the network HERE and complete the form at the bottom of the page if you’re interested in joining and I’ll be in touch with you soon! Enrolment is currently open!

 

 

Lentil Strawberry Popsicles

Lentil Strawberry Popsicles

 

For babies 6 months and up. High in iron and vitamin C, these popsicles are so easy to prep. So many parents ask me where I get these super practical small popsicle moulds. They’re so perfect because they’re made in silicone and they come out so easily (no need to run hot water over them). Here is the link to BUY THE POPSICLE MOULDS.

 

Ingredients

½ cup (125 ml) cooked green lentils (or unsalted canned green lentils, drained)

½ cup (125 ml) fresh strawberries

½ cup (125 ml) orange juice

 

Preparation

Cook the lentils. I usually cook 2 cups of dried green lentils in 6 cups of water for 20 minutes and store them in the freezer to use in recipes like this one. Be sure to use a large enough pot because the lentils expand when cooked! Place all ingredients in the blender and process until smooth. Pour into the popsicle moulds and freeze for at least an hour.

 

A great way to incorporate lentils into anyone’s diet. Vegetarian, vegan, baby led weaning, BLW, baby led weaning, babies, feeding.

This blog post contains affiliate links so you can easily find the exact products I use. If you purchase them by using these specific links, I get a very small commission. Thank you for the support!

cookies

One-bowl applesauce chia cookies for babies

One-bowl applesauce chia cookies for babies

 

This is a recipe for parents who like to experiment with different types of flours. In this recipe I used almond flour and coconut flour. It’s a gluten-free cookie recipe for babies with no refined sugar for babies 6 months and up. Super moist and easy to prep in a pinch.

I got my 3 year old to make these cookies. If she can make them, so can you!

We made our own applesauce by coring the apples and placing them in our Instant Pot on manual for 5 minutes. Then we put them in the blender for instant homemade applesauce. You can also buy applesauce if you prefer! These cookies are actually perfect for breakfast and snack. I put a bit of maple syrup for sweetness so there is no refined sugar. They’re also gluten-free!

Before introducing complementary foods to your baby, it’s important that you proceed safely no matter which approach you opt for. Some parents opt for baby led weaning (BLW) and some for the traditional approach to solids and offer purees. Be sure to obtain your information from a trusted source like my online course for introducing foods to babies here.

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

One-bowl applesauce sauce cookies recipe

Ingredients

¾ cup unsweetened applesauce

¼ cup unsalted butter, melted

1 egg

1 tsp vanilla

1 ¾ cups quick oats

½ cup almond flour

½ cup coconut flour

½ cup coconut, shredded, unsweetened

2 tbsp chia seeds

1 tsp baking soda

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp cinnamon

Directions

Preheat oven to 350F. Combine all the ingredients into a large bowl. Shape into cookies about 1 tbsp each and place on a covered baking sheet. Bake for 13 minutes or until slightly browned. Let cool and offer to your baby. Yields 24 cookies.

What did you bake with your apples this year? Comment below!

dme, alimentation autonome, purées

Can you switch to BLW? Can you do a bit of both?

Is it safe to combine spoon feeding and BLW? Can you do a bit of both?

 

I often get asked if it’s possible to switch from traditional spoon feeding to baby-led weaning (BLW), or to do a bit of both (what some call “combination feeding”). Some people say that you have to wait 2 weeks between spoon feeding before offering pieces of food but I’m here to tell you that you don’t. Purees are just another texture. Some parents decide to spoon feed their baby at first and now want to try offering pieces of food. I’m here to tell you that’s it’s never too late to start offering pieces of food to your baby but it is important to proceed safely, no matter what approach you decide to opt for. According to this research study, children introduced to lumpy food after 9 months eat less fruit and vegetables at 7 years old and have more feeding problems, so don’t offer purees forever!

What is BLW anyway?

 

With Baby Led Weaning (BLW), parents offer whole pieces of food to their baby and let them feed themselves starting at around 6 months of age. In this case, babies aren’t spoon fed by someone else.

 

Can mashed foods or purees be offered to a baby who is doing BLW?

 

If mashed foods like yogurt, mashed potatoes or apple sauce are on the menu, you can offer them in loaded spoons and let your baby bring them to their mouth on their own. All you need to do is offer the loaded spoon’s handle to your baby and let him or her feed him or herself. To learn more about how to offer loaded spoons to your baby, sign up to my online course here.

 

 

Can we switch to BLW?

 

Yes! I firmly believe that it’s never too late to switch to BLW. While a baby who has been started on purees and spoon feeding can’t truly be defined as having been fully BLW’d, it’s never too late to offer pieces of food. 

 

Everyone is entitled to change their approach when they learn something new, or when they discover that what they’ve chosen isn’t working for them.

 

Can we ‘do a bit of both’?

 

I am totally in favour of parents doing whatever works best for them and their child. If this involves a combination of spoon feeding and self-feeding, great! What this isn’t, though, is a combination of the BLW approach and the traditional approach – it’s really just the traditional approach, but starting at six months old (from when the introduction of finger foods alongside spoon-fed pureed or mashed food has always been recommended). BLW is about more than just offering your baby food to pick up – it’s about trusting him to know what he needs. If you’re topping him up with a spoon after he’s had a go with his hands, then you’re not really doing that.

 

The bottom line is that trusting your baby and not quite trusting him are simply not compatible.

 

So, while doing some self-feeding and some spoon feeding may work for you, it’s theoretically not full BLW. 

 

A lot of parents who say they are ‘doing a bit of both’ are in fact just following traditional approach, without realizing it. The reason is to do with timing: BLW was beginning to be talked about at around the same time (2002) as the minimum recommended age for solid feeding was changing from four months to six months. The result is that many parents don’t realize that finger foods were already recommended from six months – alongside purees – prior to this. They therefore believe that offering their baby any finger foods means they are ‘doing (some) BLW’. 

 

Why does this matter?

 

Does the definition of BLW really matter? I believe it does, for two reasons. First, it matters for parents who are hearing about BLW for the first time. If they are to make an informed decision about how they want to approach weaning with their baby they need to understand the underpinning ethos of BLW. If they don’t, they may implement only part of it and then be dismayed when it doesn’t ‘work’. Worse, they may do something dangerous, such as putting lumps of food into their baby’s mouth ‘for her’, which could lead to her choking.

 

The second reason I believe the definition matters is to enable an increase in knowledge about children and food – globally. If what we think may be the lifelong benefits for babies of being BLW’d (better eating habits, less risk of obesity etc.) are to be proven – or even disproven – by research, then studies need to define clearly and unambiguously what ‘true’ BLW is. If researchers set out to compare babies who have been BLW’d with babies weaned the conventional way without accurately defining what those terms mean, then there is a real risk that some babies will be said to have been BLW’d when, for example, they had purees for the first two weeks, or were routinely spoon-fed at certain meals, or were always fed separately from the rest of the family. This muddying of the waters would make the results of the research meaningless, and could well mean that some of the real benefits of BLW don’t show up. 

 

Belonging to the ‘club’

 

So what does this mean for BLW groups and forums? Should parents who are ‘doing a bit of both’, or who started off following a traditional approach and then ‘switched’ to BLW be allowed to be members of the BLW ‘club’? My answer is yes, I think they should. While I do believe it’s important for everyone to be clear whether what they are doing is or isn’t ‘true’ BLW, I don’t believe anyone should feel ostracised for not choosing (or being able) to follow it to the letter. Everyone is different: for some, their support network of family and friends is pro-BLW, while others face resistance every day. Some babies have specific medical or developmental challenges that impact on their eating. For many parents, being able to share others’ experiences is what gives them the courage to keep going at the level they are, or to make the leap to ‘full’ BLW.

 

People meet at different points along the parenting route but we can still be friends and travel together, sharing what we have in common while at the same time respecting our differences. While it’s not helpful to admit people whose intention is to make trouble, I like to think anyone who is genuinely interested in finding out more about BLW would be made to feel welcome in a BLW group.

 

About choking hazards

No matter what approach you choose, your baby can choke. He or she can choke on coins, toys, chips, candies, gum, popcorn and anything, really. That’s why every caregiver needs to know what to do in case their baby is choking. Please refer to this information from the Red Cross and take a first aid class for babies. According to Amy Brown’s research, BLW was not associated with increased risk of choking compared to spoon feeding.

 

Food pouches

Food pouches can be quite practical when out and about but I don’t routinely recommend them because they’re not very stimulating for babies. Babies just suck and swallow the applesauce and don’t even need to chew. It’s quite a passive experience. Here is a question I got from a parent:

“My baby is 14 mo. I give her pouches after a meal if she doesn’t eat much. Do you recommend those?”

I don’t recommend offering pouches after a meal if your baby doesn’t eat much because she will come to expect those if offered regularly. It can lead to more picky eating in the long run. Here and there as a convenient snack, pouches are practical but not on a regular basis. Also, it’s ok if your toddler doesn’t eat much at a meal because she is probably eating every 2-3 hours because of snacks in between meals. If she doesn’t eat much at one meal, that’s ok. She may not be feeling well or may not be hungry so will eat at the next opportunity.

 

I asked the parents who follow me on social media to ask me their questions about purees and solid foods and I answer them below. Do note that I have not met these parents so I always recommend talking to their pediatrician or nutritionist. To get my unlimited support and ask me all your specific questions (and support my business, thank you!), subscribe to my online course. 

William will be 9 months old next week. He’s been eating purees since he was 4 months old, but I’ve always offered him solid foods as well. He eats about 250 g of purées. For a few days now, we always start with the pieces and when he gets tired, he continues with purees to have the same number of grams as usual. Is this a good solution? 

Since your baby is already 9 months old, he is able to handle finger foods himself. It is certain that by stopping spoon-feeding, there will be a transition period where he will eat less. During this period, he will take a few more sips of milk and as he practices, he will eat more and more. At this age, he should eat about 3 meals a day and you can offer him food that he can grab himself with his hands. Sticks work well. All you have to do is offer safe, soft and nutrient-filled foods. For your particular situation, you can stop spoon-feeding him and offer him solid foods. For inspiration and recipe ideas, subscribe to my online course. 

 

My daughter is in the nursery and they don’t do BLW so we have started a classic diversification. She is 5 months old and cant sit up straight. When the conditions are right, can we give her solid foods on the weekend and under what conditions? 

I suggest starting introducing solid foods at around 6 months of age, when your baby shows all the signs that she is ready (see my online course). If she is offered purees at the nursery, eats them and it is going well, you can continue like that. If your baby doesn’t want to be fed and doesn’t eat much at all, you can just stop spoon-feeding her until she shows all the signs that she is ready. There is no problem feeding a baby with a spoon in the nursery and offering finger foods at home, as long as the food choice is safe. If you would like your baby to have an active and intuitive experience at all meals, you can discuss with the nursery about the benefits of BLW. Let me know in my online course if you need arguments. 

 

My daughter is 9 months old and started purees at 4.5 months old. She has difficulty with the chunks in the purees but she is getting better. I’m afraid to give her solid foods because when she eats bread, she puts it almost whole in her mouth. It scares me. 

Since your daughter is already 9 months old, you can stop purees and offer her soft and safe solid foods now (see my online course for examples of foods to offer). Here are some tips that can help you in your particular situation: 

  • You can cut her bread into various shapes (squares, rectangles, sticks) so that the feeling is different every time she takes a bite. 
  • You can offer her only one food or even one bite at a time (example: a small bite of bread) to help her take her time. 
  • You can offer her water frequently during the meal in an open cup. This will help her slow down and take her time to eat. 
  • You can introduce safe utensils such as a small fork or spoon. These require more motricity and will slow down her flow. 
  • You can talk to her during lunch about things other than what she is eating. Tell her about her toys, friends, etc. and it will make the meal experience more enjoyable. 

My baby is 7 months old. We started the classic method (cereals) at 4.5 months old, and since the age of 6 months we have been offering him food in pieces and we offer him purees at the end of the meal. Can I give him meatballs, a bell pepper or a cucumber? 

In this particular situation, you can stop feeding your baby puree. We want him to eat by himself, actively and at his own pace so that he eats enough but not too much. There may be a transition period when your baby will eat a little less until he develops the skills through practice. He will drink a little more milk and quickly become an expert eater. If the meatballs are tender enough, they can be offered to your baby, but I don’t recommend raw bell pepper and raw cucumbers to newborns because they are too hard and can cause choking. To find out what you can offer him to eat, subscribe to my online course. 

 

My baby is 7.5 months old. She’s been eating purees since she was 4.5 months old. I want to give her solid foods but she can’t sit up straight yet. Is BLW appropriate for her? 

You can read my answers above to find out how to introduce solid foods. To start introducing solid foods, I recommend that all babies be able to maintain a sitting position for a few seconds (among other things). It is important to offer a variety of textures quickly so don’t wait too long. If your baby is not able to maintain a sitting position for a few seconds at 7.5 months old, I suggest consulting a physiotherapist to see if there is a delay. 

 

My baby is 6 months old and started purees at 5 months old. He eats everything! How can I switch to solid foods? 

Since he eats everything, it is certain that by stopping spoon-feeding, there will be a transition period where he will eat less. During this period, he will take a few more sips of milk. It will only last a few days. If he shows all the signs that he is ready (see my online course), you can introduce soft pieces of solid food and stop giving him purees. 

 

Is it normal that our nursery only offers vegetables to my baby? 

Since your baby has huge nutritional needs, she needs to eat a wide variety of foods, including vegetables, fruit, meat or alternatives, good fats and others. I suggest discussing her great needs with the nursery and offering her a wide variety of foods at home. 

 

My baby is 8.5 months old and eats purees. He plays with his food. How do I make him understand that he can eat what I offer him? I want some recipe ideas for his age. 

It is still normal for your baby to play with his food. Playing, licking, throwing and chewing are part of his learning. One day, he crushes a piece of pancake, the next he takes it in his hands, and the one after that he puts it in his mouth. That’s progress! Set an example by eating with him. You can also vary the shapes of the food offered to make it more interesting for him. Here are some recipe ideas for an 8-month-old baby: 

 

Is BLW possible for a 5.5-month-old baby? He eats a little puree but not every day. 

Your 5.5-monthold baby may be BLW ready. He must absolutely show all the signs that he is ready (see my online course for the signs). Since he doesn’t seem to eat a lot of purées, you could just stop offering them and start BLW when he’s ready. 

 

My baby is 5.5 months old and her pediatrician is against BLW (choking). He recommends purees before 6 months. Despite his advice, I want to do BLW. Can I start with the purees and then switch to BLW? 

First, according to Health Canada: 

It is important for parents and caregivers to provide a variety of soft textures (such as lumpy, tenderly cooked and finely chopped, pureed, crushed or ground) and finger foods from the age of six months. 

You can discuss this with your pediatrician so that he is aware of the current recommendations. Some babies need to eat purees before 6 months of age because of a special situation (see your pediatrician). If your baby does not have a special condition, you can wait until she shows all the signs that she is ready and start introducing solid food at that time. At 5.5 months, she may be ready (see my online course), but you may also have to wait 1 to 3 weeks. There is no hurry to get started so if you want to do BLW, wait a while and it will come soon! 

 

My baby is 7 months old and is spoon-fed. She doesn’t eat much and mostly plays with the spoon. We started purees a month ago and eats very little. Can I introduce solid foods? 

Especially if she doesn’t eat much, you can offer her soft pieces of food and so she can play with them (see my online course for food ideas). You can stop giving her purees. There may be a short transition period where she will eat less, but it should not last. Since she plays with the spoon, she will play with food and will probably become an expert eater quickly! 

 

My baby is 4 months old and we started offering him purees. At what age can I combine purees and solid foods? 

If you started purees at 4 months old and it’s going well, you can introduce solid foods as soon as your baby shows the signs that he’s ready (see my online course). Most babies start at around 6 months of age. You will then be able to stop spoon-feeding him. There may be a short transition period when he eats less, but it shouldn’t last. 

If you started purees at around 4 months of age and your baby eats almost nothing, you can stop offering it altogether and introduce solid foods when he is ready, which is around 6 months for most babies. 

 

My baby is 8 months old. He eats rice cookies and pancakes. What else can I give him? 

My online course is a wealth of information for inspiring meals for babies between 6 and 12 months. There are recipes for bites, popsicles, cookies, roasted vegetables and much more. 

 

My baby is 4.5 months old. Is it safe to spoon-feed my baby with his nanny and do BLW at home? 

First, you have to ask yourself why your 4.5-month-old baby needs to start solid foods. It is rare for such a young baby to have a real need for food since his milk meets all his needs until he is about 6 months old. Ideally, I suggest waiting until your baby shows all the signs that he is ready before starting to eat, usually at around 6 months of age. You can start BLW and discuss it with your nanny to make her feel comfortable with the approach. You can even subscribe to my online course and give her access to it so she can watch all the videos of babies who are doing BLW. 

 

My baby is 7.5 months old. I’ve been trying to give him purees since he was 5 months old, but without success. He likes cookies though! What should I do now? 

Since your baby is already 7.5 months old, you can start offering him soft pieces of solid food that he can grab himself. Since he likes to grab the cookie, he will certainly not have a problem with BLW. Get inspiration for examples of meals for your baby in my online course. 

 

What’s important?

Do what is best for your family. Be informed about safe introduction of complementary foods by signing up for my online course. Know that your baby can choke on just about anything so make sure there are no choking hazards around.

 

My BLW Online Course

Check out my Infant Feeding Online Course for parents to get all the answers to your questions. In this course accessible 24/7 and worldwide, you get to ask me an unlimited number of questions and I answer them very quickly. This course is for parents who started purees and want to offer pieces of food and parents just starting out with BLW. No matter what approach you have decided to take, this course is for you because you don’t want to stay on purees forever. The courses don’t expire so sign up anytime and get lifetime access. CHECK OUT MY INFANT FEEDING COURSE TODAY!

Thank you Gill Rapley who contributed to writing parts of this blog post.

kiwi, blw, baby led weaning, baby, babyfood, food

How to Serve Kiwi to Your Baby

How to Serve Kiwi to Your Baby

Looking for a new fruit to serve your baby? Do you want your little one to experience something other than bananas and oranges while doing baby-led weaning? Why not give the kiwi a try! This fuzzy fruit is actually a berry, and pound for pound contains more vitamin C than oranges.

Ripe kiwi has the ideal texture for an infant just starting their real food journey. All that hairy skin comes in handy too. Not only is it edible, but it helps tiny hands get a good grip on an otherwise slippery fruit. Ki-Oui!

 

Watch this video to see how easy it is to prep kiwi for your BLW baby:

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

How to Prepare Kiwi for Your BLW Baby

You want to start by choosing a soft and ripe kiwi. If the fruit is underripe, the white middle section can be tough for babies who are just starting to eat on their own.

BLW, Fresh, Tasty, Salt-Free, vegetarian, vegan, fruit, breakfast, snack, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, first foods, healthy, safe, vitamin C
Gently press the skin of the kiwi; if it gives way, it is ripe!

 

Next you want to give the skin a gentle scrub under cold water. It is important that the skin is clean since it will without a doubt go into your curious baby’s mouth.

BLW, Fresh, Tasty, Salt-Free, vegetarian, vegan, fruit, breakfast, snack, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, first foods, healthy, safe, vitamin C

 

Take a sharp knife and cut the kiwi into quarters with the skin on. Cut the end corners off each quarter to ensure none of the hard stem area is included.

BLW, Fresh, Tasty, Salt-Free, vegetarian, vegan, fruit, breakfast, snack, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, first foods, healthy, safe, vitamin C
Remove the corners to make this kiwi BLW safe

 

Serve it just like that to your baby. If you find the middle section is still too tough, you can remove it before serving. If you don’t feel comfortable leaving the skin on and your baby does well without the skin, you can remove it. It’s just that the skin tends to help the kiwi slide less in their mouth. Your choice! Make sure you always supervise your baby when he or she is eating.

BLW, Fresh, Tasty, Salt-Free, vegetarian, vegan, fruit, breakfast, snack, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, first foods, healthy, safe, vitamin C
The “key”-wi to your babies health is fresh, whole foods

 

Precautions

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely
  • you read the warning below

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

 

 

Which fruits do you like serving to your BLW baby? Tell us in the comments below!

sweet potato fries, baby food

How to Serve Sweet Potatoes to Your BLW Baby

How to Serve Sweet Potato Fries to Your BLW Baby

 

As a registered dietitian, I can’t help but yam’mer on about how amazing food is, and sweet potatoes are no exception! These versatile and flavourful tubers are full to the brim with beta-carotene, which gets converted to Vitamin A in the body. That isn’t the only a-peeling part about these orange powerhouses; they are also a great source of Vitamin A, manganese, copper, B vitamins, potassium and fiber to name a few. Ain’t that sweet!  

To make a perfect vehicle for baby to get all these important nutrients, I am sharing my delicious sweet potato fry recipe. They are the perfect size and texture for your BLW baby to handle, and much tastier than the sweet potato mush you find in a baby food jar. 

 

Check out this video to see how easy it is to prep sweet potato fries for your BLW baby:

 

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

 

If you found this video useful and would like to see more like it, subscribe to my channel today!

How to Prepare Sweet Potato Fries Baby-Led Weaning Style

Start by preheating your oven to 400˚F. While it heats up, give the sweet potato a good scrub under running water.

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We are keeping the skin on to help your baby grip the fry, so make sure you scrub the potato well

Then, slice the potato in half and cut each half into slices about 1 inch thick (about the thickness of your index finger).

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Once you “fry” this recipe once, you will never go back to boiling potatoes again!

 

Time to jazz it up! Place the slices into a large bowl and drizzle enough olive oil to coat. Add 1 teaspoon of cumin, ¼ teaspoon of cinnamon and a pinch of black pepper (about 1/8th of a teaspoon). Mix thoroughly.

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Make sure to spice them up nice

 

These fries are now ready to be spread on a baking sheet covered in parchment paper, making sure there is plenty of space between each fry. Pop into the preheated oven for 25 minutes.

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Overcrowding makes for soggy fries that are harder to handle, so make sure they don’t overlap on the tray

 

Once cool enough to handle, cut a slice in half for baby and serve the rest to your family!

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Now that is a BLW baby ready to chow down! Make sure the texture is right by testing it between your tongue and the roof of your mouth.

Precautions

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely

Let us know in the comments below if you’d try sweet potato fries for your little one!

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How to Serve Salmon Sliders to Your BLW Baby

How to Serve Salmon Sliders to Your BLW Baby

We all know that fish is a very nourishing food. Full of high quality protein, easily-absorbed iron and healthy fats like omega-3’s, this underwater delight is unmatched in supporting the development of little minds and bodies.

So why don’t we often see fish given to babies? It’s all about texture. Cooked fish is often flaky, which means it does not hold well together and BLW babies have a difficult time to get the pieces to their mouth. Well here at Nutrition for Baby we believe any-fin is possible, so look no further than our salmon slider recipe to get an affordable fish serving into your BLW infants diet.

 

Watch this video to see how easy it is to prep salmon sliders for your BLW baby:

 

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

 

If you enjoyed this video and would like to see more like it, subscribe to my channel today.

 

How to Prepare Salmon Sliders for Your BLW Baby

 

Start with two cans of no salt added salmon. In a large bowl, mash the salmon with a fork. Add two large eggs to help bind everything together; stir to combine.

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Make sure you mash up those small bones really well

 

Now to add flavour! Add 1 tablespoon of fresh chopped dill, zest of 1 lime or lemon, one teaspoon of pepper, a half cup of chopped greens (spinach or kale work very well), a half cup of finely chopped onion and finally three cloves of minced garlic. Stir until well combined.

 BLW, Salt-Free, Tasty, Fish, Salmon, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, health, wellness, first foods, lunch, dinner, healthy, safe, protein, omega-3, iron
This recipe also introduces greens to BLW infant in a safe and delicious way.

 

Roll the mixture into 8 patties. Over medium heat, warm the fat of your choice, and cook each patty for 5 minutes on each side.

 BLW, Salt-Free, Tasty, Fish, Salmon, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, health, wellness, first foods, lunch, dinner, healthy, safe, protein, omega-3, iron
These sliders will hold up to a gentle browning without falling apart. I love my Lodge cast iron pan to cook them in. This pan helps to draw out iron from the sliders!

 

Let cool and serve to baby.

 BLW, Salt-Free, Tasty, Fish, Salmon, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, health, wellness, first foods, lunch, dinner, healthy, safe, protein, omega-3, iron

Precautions

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby (always test the texture of the food in between your tongue and roof of your mouth)
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely

Salmon slider recipe for babies

Ingredients

2 cans salmon in water no salt added (7 oz or 213 g each)

2 eggs

zest of 1 unwaxed lime

1 tsp (5 ml) pepper

1/2 cup (125 ml) spinach or kale, chopped

1 tbsp (15 ml) fresh dill, chopped

3 cloves of garlic, minced

1/2 cup (125 ml) onion, chopped (about 1 small onion)

1 tbsp (15 ml) cooking fat (unsalted butter or duck fat)

 

Preparation

Drain and pat dry canned salmon. Mix all ingredients together (except cooking fat). Shape into sliders about 3 tbsp (45 ml) each. Heat skillet over medium heat, add fat and pan fry them for 5 minutes on each side. Let cool and offer to your baby. Can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 5 days or in the freezer for up to 3 months.

 

Do you serve fish to your BLW baby? Let us know your methods in the comment section!

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Cherry tomato bites for babies

Cherry tomato bites for babies

 

Today I’m sharing a brand new recipe that I created for babies: Cherry Tomato Bites for Babies. It’s super simple with only a few ingredients. These cherry tomato bites can be served at any time of the day and can even be frozen and reheated to eat on the go. The texture is absolutely perfect for Baby Led Weaning (BLW).

Precautions

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby (always test the texture of the food in between your tongue and roof of your mouth)
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely
  • you read the warning below

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

 

 

bites, babies, blw, baby led weaning, baby food, recipe

 

Lots of parents ask me why I use so many eggs in the recipes I create for babies. Here’s one reason: according to new research, feeding eggs to infants could provide them with key nutrients for better brains.

 

So, how do you prep these delicious cherry tomato bites for babies?

 

Here are the ingredients that I used to prep this recipe:

 

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bites, babies, blw, baby led weaning, baby food, recipe

 

Place 6 eggs in a bowl and add warm water.

 

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Beat the mixture until it’s foamy like this:

 

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Then, add spices and spinach with cheese (optional) and mix well. Add the sliced cherry tomatoes and bake in the oven.

 

bites, babies, blw, baby led weaning, baby food, recipe

 

bites, babies, blw, baby led weaning, baby food, recipe

 

Ingredients

6 eggs

2 tbsp warm water

2 cloves of garlic

½ cup fresh basil (or 1 tbsp dried basil)

½ tsp ground pepper

1 cup spinach, chopped

1/4 cup sharp cheddar cheese (optional)

12 cherry tomatoes, sliced

 

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350F (175C) and line muffin tins. Place eggs in a large bowl and add water. Beat until foamy on high speed, about 2 minutes. Add garlic, basil, pepper, spinach and cheese. Mix well. Pour the mixture into 12 lined muffin tins and place the sliced cherry tomatoes on top of each bite. Bake in oven for 20 minutes. Let cool and enjoy!

 

I want to know: will you serve these at breakfast, lunch, dinner or snack? Comment below!

 

 

 

How to Serve Chicken Meatballs to Your BLW Baby

How to Serve Chicken Meatballs to Your BLW Baby

One of the biggest challenges of baby-led weaning is finding appropriate shapes that baby can handle, but are not a choking risk. These tender meatballs do just that. Large enough to avoid swallowing whole, but small enough to get a good grip, these curried meatballs will be a regular on your menu.

Meatballs are a great way to include high quality protein, spices and even vegetables into your baby’s diet in one convenient package. Not only that, but they are quick to prepare and will help you curry favour with the whole family. Culinary bliss is right a-round the corner!

Check out this video to see how simple it is to prepare curried chicken meatballs for your BLW baby:

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

 

Like this video? See more like it by subscribing to my Youtube channel.

How to Prepare Curry Chicken Meatballs for Your BLW Baby

Start by pre-heating your oven to 400˚F. Next, you want to put a pound of fresh ground chicken into a large mixing bowl.

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Feel free to substitute ground turkey for chicken.

 

Let’s turn up the flavour! Add half a finely diced white onion and one whole grated carrot to the bowl. Grate a tablespoon of fresh ginger into the mix and finally add two teaspoons of your favourite curry powder, a pinch of pepper and a dash of cinnamon.

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Try not to “ball” your eyes out when dicing those onions.

 

Mix all the ingredients together well. Roll the meatballs into a shape slightly larger than a golf ball and place on a covered baking tray. If you’d prefer, you can roll a few into a log shape for baby, which is even easier to handle than a ball.

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Try the log shape (seen at the bottom middle of the tray in this photo) to give baby an easier grip.

 

Bake for 20 minutes. Using an internal thermometer, check that the thickest meatball is cooked thoroughly to 165˚F, the safe temperature for ground chicken. Once cool, serve to your little one and make sure to enjoy some yourself.

If reheating, make sure you reach this same temperature before serving. Try microwaving with a bit of unsalted chicken broth or coconut milk to make sure they stay tender.

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Invest in an internal thermometer and calibrate it regularly to stay safe in the kitchen.

Precautions

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby (always test the texture of the food in between your tongue and roof of your mouth)
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely

Do you have a favourite meatball recipe? Share in the comments below!

How to Serve Seasonal Vegetables to Your BLW Baby

How to Serve Seasonal Vegetables to Your BLW Baby

We’ve all heard the buzz words around food these days. Words like sustainable, local and eco-conscious are becoming commonplace as more of us want food grown close to home using practices that are better for the planet. Baby-led weaning is an amazing way to help nurture budding environmental consciousness in your family AND nurture well-being. By choosing whole, delicious and locally sourced food that is in season, versus that which is shipped across the world, you can keep your baby (and your planet) happy and healthy.

Of course, this isn’t to say you have eat sustainably all the time (especially since we live in a frozen tundra 5 months out of the year). Sometimes it isn’t logical for busy parents, or it doesn’t fit into the budget. It is all about making small changes, and finding a balance that works for your family!

 

 

How to Prepare A Seasonal CSA Basket for Your BLW Baby

Tomatoes

Fresh tomatoes are extremely simple to prepare. Give them a gentle wash, and cut into quarters. Serve to baby as is, or with a sprinkle of pepper and italian herbs.

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As a dietitian, I love local veggies from my head to-ma-toes

 

Cucumber

Another great choice for a BLW baby is cucumber. Give it a good scrub and slice into a finger sized portion, with the skin left on for grip. Serve with a sprinkle of dried herbs.

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Stay cool as a cucumber with these simple veggie preparation tips!

 

Kale

You can include this powerhouse green into many recipes, such as salmon sliders, meatballs or even kale chips! Check out my free e-cookbook for more ideas.

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Non-seasonal veggies “kale” in comparison to local CSA produce.

 

Peppers (Bell, Sweet)

Grill or roast slices of peppers at a high temperature to help soften them for baby. Try coating them in a light layer of olive or avocado oil and marinating them in your favourite salt-free spices.

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Your family will pepper you with praise for these delectable recipes.

 

Want to see how to prep these seasonal CSA vegetables and more in a safe BLW fashion? Watch this video:

Like this content and want to see more? Then subscribe to my Youtube channel today.

 

Precautions

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby (always test the texture of the food in between your tongue and roof of your mouth)
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely
  • you read the warning below

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

 

Tell us in the comments below if you are introducing any sustainable food practices at home!