How to Practice Safe BLW During the Holidays (3 of 3): Desserts

Desserts: How to Practice Safe BLW During the Holidays (3 of 3)

Santa has some by the fireplace. They are rolled into log shapes and cut into stars. Friends trade amongst themselves and share family secrets, while kids beg to lick the bowl they were created in. Holiday desserts are a delectable part of celebrating, and an important part of a healthy adult relationship with food. However, they don’t fall into the classic baby-led weaning guidelines.

That being said, the holidays are a special occasion, which includes having all our loved ones join in the celebration. That is why we developed this final instalment of our holiday series, to discuss whether festive desserts should be given to a BLW baby.

 

Watch us explain the pros and cons of giving your baby a holiday dessert:

If you found this video useful and want to see more like it, subscribe to my channel today.

Holiday Desserts and BLW

 

Cons

Holiday cookies and desserts tend to be super sweet, and may contain ingredients that aren’t the best for baby. Your baby certainly does not need the extra sugar. Desserts also tend to contain ingredients, such as chocolate chips, edible silver balls, nuts or dried fruit, that can pose a choking hazard.

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No sugar is best for baby physically, but what about the negative emotional effects of feeling excluded from the festivities?

 

Pros

Letting your infant have a safe BLW dessert can help your child feel included in the holiday season and integrated in the festivities. Having a small amount of sugar on a rare occasion, while not necessary, won’t have a large negative impact on your little one. Not only that, but this is an opportunity to experience new flavours and textures that your baby may have otherwise not been exposed to.

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Just a little sugar will not be harmful to your BLW baby.

 

Verdict

It is really your choice as a parent if you’d like to include desserts that are the right shape and do not contain potential choking hazards. If you are still not convinced, you can try my Holiday Cut-Out Cookie recipe. They are free of refined sugar and totally appropriate for baby to give you the best of both worlds.

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The perfect compromise.

 

Are you the “it’s just once a year” or the “babies don’t need extra sugar” type of parent? Comment below!

 

How to Serve Strawberries Year Round to Your BLW Baby

How to Serve Strawberries Year Round to Your BLW Baby

 

Berries are incredibly nutritious for your little one. They tend to be very high in antioxidants, providing a good source of many vitamins and minerals. However, due to their shape and size, they can be difficult to incorporate due to choking risk. This is where whole, large strawberries come in. They are full of vitamin C and magnesium, and are the perfect size for little hands and mouths. Seems like a win-win right?

 

Not exactly. I am going to be berry frank; off season strawberries in Montreal fall into two main categories, namely 1) Expensive and 2) Tasteless. Luckily, we can get past all this by purchasing frozen berries. Not only do they tend to be cheaper, but they are picked ripe and immediately flash frozen, to help lock in nutrients and flavour. Now that’s sweet!

 

Take a look this video to see a BLW infant enjoy a thawed frozen strawberry:

 

WARNING*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

*Cusson and Labonté, Baby-Led Weaning Conference, June 2018, Nutrium, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal

 

Want more videos with info about baby led weaning by a registered dietitian? Subscribe to my channel today!

 

How to Serve a Frozen Strawberry to Your BLW Baby

 

You want to begin by choosing frozen strawberries that are whole. When selecting a few fruits from the bag for your baby, make sure to choose large berries.

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You can save even more and help reduce food waste by trying “naturally imperfect” frozen fruits.

 

Of course, frozen strawberries would be difficult to eat as is, so it is important to thaw them. The best method is to do this overnight in the fridge. The slower they are thawed, the more intact they stay. That being said if you’re in a rush and need to defrost quickly, the texture is still appropriate. Place the whole defrosted strawberry on a tray and let your BLW infant dig in.

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Simply delicious!

 

PRECAUTIONS

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely

Have you tried frozen fruit for your baby? Let us know in the comments below!

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My baby isn’t a good eater

My baby isn’t a good eater

 

It’s common for parents (and grandparents) to worry because their baby is ‘not eating well’, especially as the baby gets older. Parents are often told that he or she should be eating a full family diet by their first birthday. But is being a ‘good’ eater really necessary for the baby?

I would like to thank Gill Rapley, the one who coined the term Baby Led Weaning (BLW) who wrote the text below. Please check out her website for more information at rapleyweaning.com.


What’s normal?

 


BLW babies follow their own patterns when starting solid food. For example, your baby may:


• Set off enthusiastically, munching on everything in sight, gradually swallowing more and more of it and never looking back. (Probably the least common pattern)


• Progress slowly but steadily through looking, experimenting, licking and tasting, and then eating, gradually increasing the amount she consumes.


• Eat almost nothing for weeks or months (with or without being keen to touch and taste) and then suddenly show enthusiasm for food.


• Set off enthusiastically and then seem to lose interest in food altogether.


None of these patterns suggests a problem. Most BLW babies don’t eat significant amounts of solid food until they reach 8 or 9 months, and some not until after their first birthday. Those who start off enthusiastically and then lose interest simply enjoy the novelty of food more than those who start more slowly. When that wears off, they slow down for a while. [Note, though, that if a baby of 6-8 months shows no interest in picking up food or any other objects (such as toys or keys) and exploring them with her mouth it’s possible there’s an underlying reason, such as delayed development, so she should be checked by a doctor.]

 

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This baby is thoroughly enjoying her meal!

Putting things into perspective

A normally developing, healthy baby who appears to be ‘not eating well’ is probably just eating less than his parents or others think he should. In the second half of their first year, the only nutrients babies need in addition to breast milk are iron and zinc. A few licks or bites (not mouthfuls!) each day from foods rich in these minerals, such as meat and eggs, is almost certainly enough to provide this. Babies don’t starve themselves – if they are hungry, they will eat. The problem is that our expectations of how much babies should eat tends to be based on the amounts they eat when they’re spoon fed. But …

 

  • Spoon feeding (by someone else) is not a natural part of babies’ development. It just became the usual method of feeding when it was thought babies needed solid food before they were old enough to feed themselves.
  • Spoon feeding and purees make it difficult for babies to follow their appetite. They tend to swallow mouthfuls faster and end up eating more than they really need.
  • Pureed food contains a lot of liquid – so it may look like more food than it really is.
  • Pressuring a baby to eat certain foods, or more than they want, can lead to problems
    such as picky eating or food refusal.
  • Breast-milk (or formula) can continue to provide most of a baby’s nourishment well beyond one year.

 

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Despite baby’s introduction to solid foods, breastfeeding (or formula) remains the primary source of nourishment.

What are the signs of a ‘ good eater ‘?

 

If you think your baby is a ‘poor eater’, the solution is not to try to change what the baby is doing but to redefine what you think makes a good eater. A good eater is a baby who:


• responds to his own appetite (eating when he’s hungry, stopping when he’s had enough)
• drinks as much breastmilk or formula as he needs
• has the opportunity to try lots of different foods, without any pressure
• can choose the nutrients he needs (from healthy food offered)
• is interested in exploring food and practising self-feeding skills
• enjoys mealtimes

If your baby does all of these things, he’s a good eater – even if he doesn’t actually swallow very much at all!


What should I do?

 

  • Continue to offer breastfeeds or formula whenever your baby wants. Restricting milk feeds (as parents are sometimes advised to do in the hope the baby will eat more solid food) is likely to mean less nourishment not more.
  • Continue to share mealtimes with your baby, giving her the opportunity to explore and taste a range of healthy foods.
  •  If your baby is over 10 months, don’t keep giving her back food that has been deliberately thrown on the floor. This is her way of saying “No thanks”.
  • Try offering foods in smaller pieces, or introducing cutlery. Some babies get bored with being treated as newbies and want to practise more advanced skills!
  • Don’t make a fuss if your baby doesn’t seem to like something. Just carry on offering some of whatever you are eating. (Some babies persistently avoid certain foods and are later found to be allergic to them, so it may be wise to trust your baby.)
  • Remember that it’s normal for a baby who is unsettled for some reason (starting daycare for example) or becoming unwell, to go off solid food for a while and want more milk.

 

Baby-led weaning is about nurturing a good relationship with food, not about persuading babies to eat what we think they should. All babies spontaneously move on to other foods in their own time. As a parent, all you need to do is make food available, within reach, and to act as a role model by including the baby in your own mealtimes. Your baby will take care of everything else.

Precautions

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely
  • you read the warning below

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

*Cusson and Labonté, Baby-Led Weaning Conference, June 2018, Nutrium, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal

 

To get all the information you need about introducing complementary foods, sign up for my online course at blw.jessicacoll.com . You’ll get my unlimited support and all the answers to your questions.

 

I’d like to know: is your baby a good eater? Why or why not? Comment below!

 

How to Practice Safe BLW During the Holidays (2 of 3): Foods to Avoid

How to Practice Safe BLW During the Holidays (2 of 3): Foods to Avoid

During this festive season, we want you and your family to stay happy, healthy, and of course, safe. That is why we developed part two of our series on how to practice safe BLW during the holidays.

There are many holiday foods, during any occasion whether it be Christmas, Chanukah or Kwanzaa, that are safe for baby with modifications. However, certain foods should be avoided if you want the challah-days to stay safe, and we have listed several of them in this post.

 

Watch this video to see which foods should be avoided during the holiday season for BLW infants:

Like this video and want to see more free BLW content by a registered dietitian? Subscribe to my channel today!

Precautions

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby (always test the texture of the food in between your tongue and roof of your mouth)
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely
  • you read the warning below

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

*Cusson and Labonté, Baby-Led Weaning Conference, June 2018, Nutrium, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal

 

Traditional Holiday Foods to Avoid in BLW

 

Certain Appetizers or Snack Foods 

Any small, hard and round snack food is a choking hazard for baby. This includes festive popcorn, fancy escargot and many items on a charcuterie board, including olives, nuts, grapes or hard cheeses.  Holiday candies or chocolate should also be completely avoided.

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Certain Fruits and Vegetables

The cherry tomatoes or raw vegetables you see on a holiday platter are often too hard or are the wrong shape for baby. Other common holiday foods to be avoided are peas, cranberries (including sauces), and pomegranate seeds.

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Pomegranates are delicious but are too small, round, and hard for your BLW baby.

 

Fresh White Bread

Fresh white bread is often an accompaniment to holiday meals, but for baby it can become very sticky while they try to manipulate it in their mouth. Fresh bread mixed with saliva can get stuck on the roof of the mouth and is therefore a choking hazard.

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Raw Fish or Raw Meats

Even though smoked salmon or oysters may seem like the right texture, they have not been properly heat treated to remove the risk of contamination. For this reason, they should be avoided.

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Follow these tips during the holidays and throughout the year to keep your little one safe.

 

Precautions

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby (always test the texture of the food in between your tongue and roof of your mouth)
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely
  • you read the warning below

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

*Cusson and Labonté, Baby-Led Weaning Conference, June 2018, Nutrium, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal

Do you feel comfortable about which foods to avoid during the holidays? Let us know in the comments below!

How to Practice Safe BLW During the Holidays (1 of 3): Foods to Include

How to Practice Safe BLW During the Holidays (1 of 3): Foods to Include

🎶Fa-ba-ba-ba-ba, ba-ba-ba-baby led weaning🎶! It is that time of year again (the holidays!), full of yuletide and cheer, family and friends, and of course, good food and drink. We think you should spend this time with loved ones, not lugging around jars of baby food or stressing over finding the microwave in a turbulent holiday kitchen.

So how can you include your BLW bonhomme-de-neige in the festivities safely? With baby-led weaning, your baby can eat the same thing as the rest of the family, with some simple modifications. Brace your elves because we have a foolproof ‘how-to’ guide coming up!

 

Watch us explain how simple BLW during the holiday season can be in this video:

If you enjoyed this video and would like to see more like it, subscribe to my channel today!

 

Common Holiday Foods Modified for BLW

 

Turkey

This classic holiday protein is delicious and nutritious. For baby, offer the dark meat as it is usually more tender, and contains more of the iron and fat that baby needs. Remove the skin, which contains most of the salt, and choose a piece that is about the size of an adult pinky finger.

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You’ll be stuffed with ideas once you have read through this guide.

 

Steamed Green Beans

Tender steamed beans are perfect both in shape and texture for BLW babies. Make sure to rinse off any sauces that may be served with the beans.

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Steaming the beans locks in the nutrients but makes them tender enough for little mouths.

 

Precautions

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby (always test the texture of the food in between your tongue and roof of your mouth)
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely
  • you read the warning below

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

*Cusson and Labonté, Baby-Led Weaning Conference, June 2018, Nutrium, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal

 

Potatoes 

Mashed potatoes can be offered right on your babies platter, or on a preloaded spoon. Another option is scalloped potatoes, which have a wonderful soft texture and if cut thick enough, are easy for baby to grab and bring to their mouth.

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Make sure mashed potatoes are made extra creamy, so there are no lumps.

 

Anything Else!

Having something other than these three common foods? Try it out yourself before serving it to baby! First, always make sure the food is about the size of an adult pinky finger or larger. Then, pretend you have no teeth and squish it against the roof of your mouth with your tongue. If it comes apart and is easy to swallow, it is safe to offer to baby.

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Will you include baby at the holiday table? Tell us in the comment section.

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How to Serve Salmon Sliders to Your BLW Baby

How to Serve Salmon Sliders to Your BLW Baby

We all know that fish is a very nourishing food. Full of high quality protein, easily-absorbed iron and healthy fats like omega-3’s, this underwater delight is unmatched in supporting the development of little minds and bodies.

So why don’t we often see fish given to babies? It’s all about texture. Cooked fish is often flaky, which means it does not hold well together and BLW babies have a difficult time to get the pieces to their mouth. Well here at Nutrition for Baby we believe any-fin is possible, so look no further than our salmon slider recipe to get an affordable fish serving into your BLW infants diet.

 

Watch this video to see how easy it is to prep salmon sliders for your BLW baby:

 

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

*Cusson and Labonté, Baby-Led Weaning Conference, June 2018, Nutrium, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal

 

If you enjoyed this video and would like to see more like it, subscribe to my channel today.

 

How to Prepare Salmon Sliders for Your BLW Baby

 

Start with two cans of no salt added salmon. In a large bowl, mash the salmon with a fork. Add two large eggs to help bind everything together; stir to combine.

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Make sure you mash up those small bones really well

 

Now to add flavour! Add 1 tablespoon of fresh chopped dill, zest of 1 lime or lemon, one teaspoon of pepper, a half cup of chopped greens (spinach or kale work very well), a half cup of finely chopped onion and finally three cloves of minced garlic. Stir until well combined.

 BLW, Salt-Free, Tasty, Fish, Salmon, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, health, wellness, first foods, lunch, dinner, healthy, safe, protein, omega-3, iron
This recipe also introduces greens to BLW infant in a safe and delicious way.

 

Roll the mixture into 8 patties. Over medium heat, warm the fat of your choice, and cook each patty for 5 minutes on each side.

 BLW, Salt-Free, Tasty, Fish, Salmon, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, health, wellness, first foods, lunch, dinner, healthy, safe, protein, omega-3, iron
These sliders will hold up to a gentle browning without falling apart. I love my Lodge cast iron pan to cook them in. This pan helps to draw out iron from the sliders!

 

Let cool and serve to baby.

 BLW, Salt-Free, Tasty, Fish, Salmon, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, health, wellness, first foods, lunch, dinner, healthy, safe, protein, omega-3, iron

Precautions

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby (always test the texture of the food in between your tongue and roof of your mouth)
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely

Salmon slider recipe for babies

Ingredients

2 cans salmon in water no salt added (7 oz or 213 g each)

2 eggs

zest of 1 unwaxed lime

1 tsp (5 ml) pepper

1/2 cup (125 ml) spinach or kale, chopped

1 tbsp (15 ml) fresh dill, chopped

3 cloves of garlic, minced

1/2 cup (125 ml) onion, chopped (about 1 small onion)

1 tbsp (15 ml) cooking fat (unsalted butter or duck fat)

 

Preparation

Drain and pat dry canned salmon. Mix all ingredients together (except cooking fat). Shape into sliders about 3 tbsp (45 ml) each. Heat skillet over medium heat, add fat and pan fry them for 5 minutes on each side. Let cool and offer to your baby. Can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 5 days or in the freezer for up to 3 months.

 

Do you serve fish to your BLW baby? Let us know your methods in the comment section!

How to Serve Pancakes to Your BLW Baby

How to Serve Pancakes to Your BLW Baby

Golden, buttery stacks, dripping with syrup and served on a weekend when there is plenty of time for preparation and clean up. This is usually the image we see when we consider making pancakes for the family. Not only is this image not very BLW friendly, but spending a day off cleaning batter from the walls and syrup off the floors can seem less than appealing to busy parents.

Don’t take out your mops and wet-wipes quite just yet, because we have a recipe that might just change your mind. Fluffy, delicious and whipped up in just minutes, these two ingredient banana pancakes are a piece of (pan)cake to get on, and off, the table!

 

Take a look at this video to see how simple preparing pancakes for BLW baby can be:

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

*Cusson and Labonté, Baby-Led Weaning Conference, June 2018, Nutrium, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal

Like this video? Want to see more like it? Then subscribe to my channel today.

 

How to Prepare Banana Pancakes for Your BLW Baby

 

Take one large, very ripe banana and mash it in a bowl with a fork.

Pancakes, BLW, Salt-Free, Tasty, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, first foods, breakfast, snack, healthy, safe, health, wellness
We were inspired by Jack Johnson to make baby banana pancakes and pretend like it’s the weekend 🎶 🎶

 

Then, crack two eggs into the bowl. Mix them in with the banana and whisk until everything is well combined.

Pancakes, BLW, Salt-Free, Tasty, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, first foods, breakfast, snack, healthy, safe, health, wellness
Feel free to add ground cinnamon or nutmeg at this step.

 

Melt some oil or butter in a skillet over low to medium heat. Drop about 1 tablespoon worth of batter into the pan to make one perfect BLW sized pancake.

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Using a cast iron pan actually improves the iron content of this dish. I use my Lodge Cast iron pan to cook everything!

 

Flip the pancakes after one minute and brown on the other side for an additional minute. Remove from the pan gently.

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Try a thin layer of natural peanut butter for an added punch of nutrition.

 

Allow the pancakes to cool, serve to your BLW baby and watch them devour!

Pancakes, BLW, Salt-Free, Tasty, baby, baby led weaning, infant, nutrition, first foods, breakfast, snack, healthy, safe, health, wellness
Super soft and delectable!

 

Precautions

Before doing Baby-Led Weaning (BLW) with your baby, it is important to proceed safely by contacting a pediatric registered dietitian. Among other things, make sure that:

  • your baby is ready and does not start too early
  • your baby is sitting at 90 degrees
  • you do not place food in his/her mouth with your fingers
  • the environment is calm during meals
  • you offer the right foods to your baby (always test the texture of the food in between your tongue and roof of your mouth)
  • you watch your baby eat at all times
  • you contact a pediatric registered dietitian to make sure you are proceeding safely
  • you read the warning below

Warning*

BLW is contraindicated for babies at risk of dysphagia, such as babies who have an anatomic disorder (cleft palate, tongue tie), a neurological disorder (developmental delay, hypotonia, oral hypotonia) or a genetic disorder. Follow-up by a health professional (doctor, pediatric registered dietitian) is necessary for babies at risk of anemia such as babies born prematurely, babies with low birth weight (less than 3000 g), worries related to growth, babies born to an anemic mother, baby for whom cow’s milk was introduced early and/or a vegan baby.

*Cusson and Labonté, Baby-Led Weaning Conference, June 2018, Nutrium, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal

Would you try making these not-just-for-the-weekend pancakes? Tell us in the comments section!